Unanswered questions about COVID's origins – Axios

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The Wuhan Institute of Virology. Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images
As the world nears two years after the first reported cases of COVID-19 in Wuhan, China, there's still a lot more we don't know about SARS-CoV-2's origins than we do know.
Why it matters: Accurately determining the causes of COVID-19 will go a long way toward informing what can and should be done to prevent the next pandemic.
Driving the news: Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal reported the WHO is reviving its stalled investigation into the origins of COVID-19, while a separate academic task force looking into the same question was disbanded over concerns about bias.
What they're saying: On Thursday morning, Science magazine convened a rare roundtable featuring scientists from both sides of the debate.
The other side: Michael Worobey, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Arizona, argued there were "so many more opportunities for non-research-connected activity to bring these viruses" to Wuhan, such as via China's robust wildlife trade.
The bottom line: With time running out to gather more evidence — and the Chinese government stonewalling further efforts — the chance of finding a definitive answer is dwindling.
Photo: Olukayode Jaiyeola/NurPhoto via Getty Images
The World Bank announced Thursday plans to give Nigeria $400 million to help fund COVID-19 vaccines for its citizens.
Why it matters: The World Bank stated that the additional funding, provided through the International Development Association, would help Nigeria vaccinate 51% of its citizens in two years.
The "Aladdin" Broadway musical displayed outside the New Amsterdam Theatre on Oct. 1 in New York City. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images
The Broadway hit “Aladdin” announced Friday it temporarily put Genie back in the lamp and canceled all future shows until Oct. 12 because of breakthrough COVID-19 cases among cast members.
Why it matters: The show had just reopened Tuesday after being dark for 18 months because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Nick Clegg, Facebook's vice president of policy and global affairs. Photo: Jack Taylor/Getty Images
Facebook executive Nick Clegg said in a defiant internal memo that a former employee will accuse the company of contributing to the U.S. Capitol riot, the New York Times first reported Saturday.
Why it matters: Facebook appears to be launching a pre-emptive strike against the whistleblower with the memo, also shared with Axios, ahead of her CBS "60 Minutes" interview airing Sunday and her scheduled appearance at a Senate hearing Tuesday.

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